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Conference Agenda

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Last updated: March 27, 2014 (Agenda subject to change)

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NOTE: Workshops require additional pre-registration and a workshop fee. Please see the specific workshop below for the applicable fee information.

APDT 2014 Conference Agenda

Wednesday, October 15

Time Events
8:30 am

Conference Welcome

9:15 am

Keynote Presentation: People, Dogs and Psychological Trauma

Patricia McConnell

11:30 am

Canine Evolution

Ray Coppinger

12:30 pm

Lunch on Your Own

2:00 pm

Workshops

Small Group, Interactive and/or Live Animal Demos from 2:00 pm - 5:15 pm

Trick Training for Behavior Problems

Dee Hoult

Requires additional pre-registration and workshop fee
$75 for Handlers
$50 for Observers

3:30 pm

Break

3:45 pm
5:15 pm

Conference Puppy Orientation

6:00 pm

Grand Opening Trade Show and Reception

Thursday, October 16

Time Events
7:00 am

A.M. Risers

8:00 am

APDT Shorts

9:00 am

Workshops

Small Group, Interactive and/or Live Animal Demos from 9:00 am - 4:45 pm

DAY-LONG CERTIFICATE COURSE (OFF SITE)
Close Your Mouth and Open Your Eyes: Behavior Observations in the Field

Sue Sternberg

Requires additional pre-registration and workshop fee
$130 for Participants

DAY-LONG CERTIFICATE COURSE
Don't Worry - Dogs Love Me! Working With Human Reactive Dogs 101

Emma Parsons

Requires additional pre-registration and workshop fee
$75 for Participants

DAY-LONG CERTIFICATE COURSE
Friend or Foe? Dissecting Dog on Dog Play

Robin Bennett
Susan Briggs

Requires additional pre-registration and workshop fee
$75 for Handlers
$65 for Observers

10:30 am

Break

10:45 am
12:15 pm

Lunch on Your Own & Meet the Board

1:30 pm
3:00 pm

Break

3:15 pm

Trade Show Hours: 11:30 am - 2:00 pm; 4:00 - 7:00 pm
Evening Events: Dine Around Networking and Making Toys Workshop with Teoti Anderson

Friday, October 17

Time Events
7:00 am

A.M. Risers

8:00 am

APDT Shorts

9:00 am

Workshops

Small Group, Interactive and/or Live Animal Demos from 9:00 am - 4:45 pm

DAY-LONG CERTIFICATE COURSE (OFF-SITE)
Close Your Mouth and Open Your Eyes: Behavior Observations in the Field

Sue Sternberg

Requires additional pre-registration and workshop fee
$130 for Participants

DAY-LONG CERTIFICATE COURSE
Don't Worry - Dogs Love Me! Working With Human Reactive Dogs 201

Emma Parsons

Requires additional pre-registration and workshop fee
$75 for Handlers
$65 for Observers

DAY-LONG CERTIFICATE COURSE
Friend or Foe: Dissecting Dog on Dog Play

Robin Bennett
Susan Briggs

Requires additional pre-registration and workshop fee
$75 for Handlers
$65 for Observers

IAABC Workshop: Advanced Behavior Techniques and Practices

Requires additional pre-registration and workshop fee
$100 for Full Day
$55 Morning only
$55 Afternoon only

10:30 am

Break

10:45 am
12:15 pm

Lunch on Your Own & Roundtable Discussions

1:30 pm
3:00 pm

Break

3:15 pm

Afternoon Seminars (cont'd)

Concurrent seminars from 3:15 pm - 4:45 pm

Canine Social and Psychological Development (continued)

Gail Fisher

APDT Foundation
Scientific Poster
Presentations (continued)

Isn't It Time for Applied Learning Theory
(Details TBA)

Ian Dunbar

Redefining the Dog Training Professional

Teoti Anderson

Trade Show Hours: 11:30 am - 2:00 pm; 4:00 - 7:00 pm
Scientific Posters Available for Viewing in the Exhibit Hall: 12:15 - 1:15 pm and 5:00 - 6:00 pm
Evening Events: The APDT Foundation Auction and Reception 6:30 pm

Saturday, October 18

Time Events
7:00 am

APDT Foundation 5K Run/Walk and 1 Mile Walk

8:45 am

Workshops

Small Group, Interactive and/or Live Animal Demos from 8:45 am - 3:00 pm

DAY-LONG CERTIFICATE COURSE
A Crash Course in "Cat"

Jaqueline Munera

Requires additional pre-registration and workshop fee
$75 for Handlers
$55 for Observers

DAY-LONG CERTIFICATE HYBRID COURSE
OMIT: The 4 Step Process to Success with Every Client

Amber Burckhalter

Requires additional pre-registration and workshop fee
$75 for Handlers
$65 for Observers

DAY-LONG CERTIFICATE HYBRID COURSE
Finding the Courage: A Step by Step Guide to Starting Your Dog Training Business

Dee Hoult

Requires additional pre-registration and workshop fee
$50 for Participants

10:15 am

Break

10:30 am

Morning Seminars (cont'd)

Concurrent seminars from 10:30 am - 12:00 pm

DAY-LONG CERTIFICATE COURSE
Living and Learning with Animals (continued)

Susan Friedman

DAY-LONG CERTIFICATE COURSE
How to Achieve a Successful Outcome (continued)

Christopher Pachel

Canine Athlete or Canine Couch Potato? (continued)

Linda Case

Optimizing Canine Performance - Advanced

Robert Gillette

12:00 pm

Lunch on Your Own & Roundtable Discussions

1:30 pm
3:00 pm

Break

3:45 pm

Closing Presentation: Dog Training: From Where We Came to Where We Are Going

Ken McCort

Trade Show Hours: 9:00 am to 3:00 pm

 

People, Dogs and Psychological Trauma

Patricia McConnell, PhD, CAABPresenter

Patricia McConnell, PhD, CAAB

Summary

Psychological Trauma is defined as an event or experience that completely overwhelms an individual's ability to cope. This presentation will initiate an inquiry into three basic questions related to trauma in people and dogs:

If we accept that both dogs and people can be traumatized, how would our experiences be similar? How would they be different?

What can treatments for human victims of trauma teach us about treating trauma in dogs? What about the other direction—from dogs to people?

What do we know, both from science and anecdotal experience, that can help us evaluate the practice of using dogs to help people recover from trauma?

Included will be discussions about whether dogs can suffer from PTSD, how to determine if a dog's behavior might be related to trauma, and the costs and benefits of asking dogs to help people heal from psychological trauma.

Learning Outcomes / Objectives

Participant will gain knowledge about the biology of trauma, including its comparative effects on people and dogs.

Participants will gain knowledge about the treatment of trauma, both in people and dogs, including the use of dogs as adjunctive therapists to people with PTSD.

×

Canine Evolution

Dr. Raymond CoppingerPresenter

Dr. Raymond Coppinger

Summary

Don't miss out on this opportunity to be captivated by the renowned Dr. Ray Coppinger as he shares his extensive experience with, research in, and knowledge of canines and their evolution.

×

The Behavioral Ecology of Dogs

Dr. Raymond CoppingerPresenter

Dr. Raymond Coppinger

Summary

There are estimated to be a billion dogs in the world! 850 million of them are living outside the control of humans. By "control" we mean fences and leashes, spaying/neutering, controlled breeding, nutrition and diet, training, veterinary care, and many other factors humans take for granted when it comes to dogs. This session will look at populations of dogs who not only fend for themselves, find their own feed, and have a wonderful reproductive life, - they are actually are one of the most successful species on the planet.  How do they do it?

Learning Outcomes / Objectives

Attendees of this event will:

Consider dogs in the way a biologist might

Consider dogs in the way an ecologist might

Consider dogs in the way an ethologist might

Target Level of Knowledge

It is assumed that before attending this session, attendees:

Are not familiar with the research surrounding landraces of dogs -

Have little to no experience with ecological, biological, and ethological factors surrounding these dog populations

×

Friend or Foe: Dissecting Dog-to-Dog Interactions to Keep Dogs Safe

Robin Bennett, CPDT-KAPrimary Presenter

Robin Bennett, CPDT-KA

Secondary Presenter

Susan Briggs

Summary

Understanding canine play behaviors is critical to providing safe off-leash play services.  Attendees of this workshop will work with live dogs as they learn and practice dog play styles, leadership skills, dog management techniques and when to intervene to keep play safe and fun.
Once you complete the workshop you will:

Possess a foundation of off-leash play group knowledge to provide professional pet care services

Recognize the four main dog play styles

Know the early warning signs that indicate a dog is uncomfortable

Recognize warning signals that are important dog communication

Develop good dog leader and management skills

Keep dogs happy and safe in your care

Learning Outcomes / Objectives

Attendees of this event will:

Recognize the four main dog play styles

Match proper playstyles together to create the best playgroups within 15 minutes of dog meeting

Create a plan for proper ways to intervene and when to separate dogs before an incident occurs

Understand how to classify dogs using the traffic management signal and how to move a dog from one color to the other to better manage play.

Identify the best tools and practices to safely manage a group and learn the top three tools used by an experienced leader of an off-leash playgroup

Recognize warning signals that are important part of dog communication during the fluid movement of dogs interacting

Identify the five most important questions to ask before you take off a dog's leash for playgroups

Develop the three best leadership skills to help manage dogs without physical force or manipulation

Recognize the warning signals to a potential fight and how to minimize the risk of dog fights and fights during off-leash play.

Target Level of Knowledge

It is assumed that before attending this session, attendees:

Have a basic knowledge of dog body language

Have little experience monitoring a group off dogs playing off-leash together.

Are experienced off-leash play supervisors who want to learn to improve their skills in teach owners and other staff members to better manage dogs without force, manipulation or yelling.

×

Beat the Clock – Shave Time Off Work, Create More Margin in Life

Robin Bennett, CPDT-KAPresenter

Robin Bennett

Summary

Ever feel overwhelmed?  Your schedule out of control?  Too much to do and too many commitments pulling you in different directions?  Ever feel like you're too busy for the things that matter most? Wonder how you can spend so much time with other people's dogs and not enough time with your own?  If so, you are not alone.  Juggling your dog training business on top of everything else you do is hard! More and more, people are falling victim to the "busy trap" and losing a sense of control, meaning and purpose for their lives.

This informative and inspirational seminar designed to help you gain more relaxed control over your life. You will learn key concepts and best practices for managing multiple commitments and investing your time and energy in the things that are really important to you.  You will discover:

The truth about "time management"

The big mistake many people make that leads to major frustration

The four habits that all successful people share in common

The primary causes of procrastination and how to overcome them

The best way to avoid some interruptions and handle the inevitable ones

The difference between "good stress" and "bad stress"

How to get what you really want and enjoy what you've got

The amazing power of personal development

How making many commitments may be a sign that you lack commitment

A systemized approach to planning your schedule and reaching your goals

And much more……

If you want to enjoy more fulfillment, meaning, joy and fun in your life, perhaps it's time to "Beat the Clock – Shave Time Off Work, Create More Margin in Life." This could be the day that turns your life around, so don't miss it. 

Learning Outcomes / Objectives

By the end of this session, attendees should be able to do the following:

Name the principle of self-management which isn't really about time at all.

Create a calendar of their ideal week during the workshop which they can use to get their schedule in order

Create a process for capturing and prioritizing their work each morning

See the importance of a weekly review to give them more time to spend on what's important

Compile a list of tools and resources they can begin using right away to help put order back in their life

Target Level of Knowledge

Attendees should be busy professionals seeking to create more control and space in their life.

Attendees should be seeking to increase their knowledge of time-management principles, goal setting principles, or organizing their work flow into efficient processes.

×

Taking Dog Bites from 60 to 0: Common Sense Diffusion of Community Hysteria

Janis BradleyPresenter

Janis Bradley

Summary

People have fear thresholds too. The topic of dog bites excites human emotions, especially in response to terrifying media coverage of a truly serious event. This program shows how to approach the issue of dog bites with dog owners, municipalities, and shelters in a neutral, non-biased, common sense way that calms fears rather than escalates worry. Dog trainers are the behavior experts in their communities and can help diffuse hysteria to prevent dogs from losing their homes unnecessarily and help communities find alternatives to pursuing knee-jerk policies that damage the human-canine bond. This session will provide an arsenal of facts and framing strategies to combat harmful, exaggerated responses. Attendees will learn about incidence and risk factors for the full range of events from the mundane "tooth related incidents," as common as dogs themselves, to the truly terrible, dog bite related fatalities, and why it is crucial to distinguish between injurious and non-injurious bites.  You will also learn how to talk with clients and decision makers about warning signals and bites as behaviors to be analyzed and modified (when necessary) like any interaction between people and their dogs, rather than as personality traits of defective dogs. We know how to ease fear thresholds in dogs to help them learn to change their behavior. It's time we do the same for our human clients.

Learning Outcomes / Objectives

By the end of this session, attendees should be able to do the following:

Be able to appropriately recite and explain 3 key facts about dog bite incidence

Describe dog bites in behavioral rather than abstract language

Give 3 reasons why "Which dogs bite?" is the wrong question

Target Level of Knowledge

Already work with or plan to work with assessment of injurious bite risks in dogs as private behavior consultants, class instructors, or as a shelter/rescue consultant

Are uncertain how to work with or educate key community players – such as legislators, police, parents, etc. – regarding concerns related to dog bites.

×

OMIT: The 4 step process to success with every client

Amber BurckhalterPresenter

Amber Burckhalter, CDBC, CNWI

Summary

Professional dog training is more than just teaching the basic technical commands or directing clients on how to work with their own dogs.  Professional trainers must take on a holistic view of the client team, including the dog and all relevant players, and the training objectives in order to be successful.  However, how does one take in all the random information, interpret this information so it is relevant and form a training plan that will work with each client team in a timely manner? How does the professional trainer design and implement a program that is highly successful and integrates outside resources such as veterinarians, sports dog specialist, daycare facilities and more?  The OMIT program teaches the process from introduction to the client team in any arena (group or private setting, shelter or in home) to designing an effective training protocol through the skills of observation, teamwork and development.  This program allows the trainer to choose the right approach and follow that approach and plan to completion. OMIT is applicable in all training realms: aggression, fear, basic obedience, sport dog training and more and is shown to increase the success rate of client teams over 78%.

Because this course is an APDT Hybrid course, four weeks of education take place online, and an additional session occurs in person, on Saturday 10/18 of the 2014 APDT Conference. To receive credit for the certificate, Full students must register for and complete both the 1) online portion of this course AND 2) hands-on workshop at Conference. Auditing students are not required to do so.

Learning Outcomes / Objectives

Trainers will have the opportunity to develop training plans in a hands on workshop that will include all 4 aspects of the OMIT program and work through to completion with a client team in a hands on, real life reproduced clinic.

Trainers will learn how to interpret information, verbal and non verbal, presented in consults into relevant information for designing a successful training plan.

Trainers will learn about interventions and management techniques outside of technical training, when to use them and how to access them for increased successful outcomes.

Trainers will gain confidence and clarity using this new four step process that they can increase successful outcomes for their clients and monitor that success.

Target Level of Knowledge

Prior to attending this session, it is assumed attendees:

Have a thorough understanding of operant conditioning.

Have a basic understanding of reward based training.

Are ready to go beyond the "technical" side of training.

Are already working with clients privately, shelters, rescues or in group classes.

Have a basic understanding of canine body language.

Want to see increased success in their client teams.

×

Tomatoes, Ticklers, and Time: Working Smarter in the Digital Age

Chris LeePresenter

Chris Lee

Summary

We live in the supposedly always-connected, always-available, instantaneous digital age.

Why, then, is there just never enough time in the day to get everything done? Why is it that some people seem to get more accomplished and create a harmonious work/life balance?  Remember, everyone has exactly the same number of hours in their day: twenty four. So, what is it that they doing that you are not?

This session will show you how to save time and get organized in the digital age. Using his no-nonsense, in-the-trenches approach with tips/demos/examples, Chris will show you how to transition from being "busy" to being "productive" in an era of texts, beeps, and tweets. He will examine the myth of multi-tasking, show you how to properly segment time and prioritize, eliminate social media distractions, and tame your pesky smartphone. Both old-school and new digital time-saving tools will be presented.  And, finally, once and for all, he will get your email inbox under control.

If you find yourself overwhelmed by time, technology, and distractions, then this session is for you. It is presented by a very busy IT consultant and app developer who is required to manage dozens of projects and hundreds of emails each day. Effective time management in the IT industry is a mandatory skill --- and Chris will show you how to apply it specifically to your dog training business and personal life.

Learning Outcomes / Objectives

By the end of this session, attendees should be able to do the following:

Understand the key difference between being "busy" and being "productive"

Develop specific techniques to better organize and manage email

Evaluate the pros and cons of smartphone use for productivity

Understand why multi-tasking is generally multi-nothing

Immediately apply new technologies and digital measuring tools to manage and free your time

Learn what a "tickler" file is and why it's an important tool for calendar scheduling

Become familiar with the Pomodoro Technique and how to apply it in the digital age

Target Level of Knowledge

Prior to attending this session, it is assumed all attendees:

Have no prior knowledge pertaining to this subject

Are feeling overwhelmed, constantly distracted, and regularly take their smartphones into the bathroom with them.

×

Dog Food Logic: Learning to Make Smart Feeding Choices for Dogs

Linda P. Case, MSPresenter

Linda P. Case, MS

Summary

This seminar examines the current state of the pet food industry and how the proliferation of dog food choices has influenced our perception of dog nutrition and our ability to choose wisely (and healthfully) for our dogs. We begin with an examination of how feeding experiences with our dogs impact decision-making and a discussion of the importance of considering both our deep emotional bonds with our dogs (and commitments to caring for them) along with the science of nutrition when making choices. We then study a range of information types that are available to pet food customers today and identify benefits and limitations of each. This section is followed by a review of the dog's energy and nutrient needs, including a close examination of how the domestic dog is classified (carnivore, omnivore, hunter, scavenger?) and how classification impacts our feeding decisions for them. The third section of the seminar focuses on the state of the pet food industry today.

Attendees will learn to discern between nutritional claims that are evidence-based and those that represent marketing hype or advertising appeals used to evoke emotions and influence purchasing habits. The seminar will include a series of exercises that allow each attendee to evaluate foods, discuss current beliefs and research with others, and explore a variety of feeding choice options for dogs.

Attendees will complete seminar with an enhanced ability to select a dog food using science-based evidence, an understanding of the pet food industry (and its marketing ploys), and specific aspects of a dog's age and health, while still considering their own goals and personal values.

Learning Outcomes / Objectives

By the end of this session, attendees should be able to do the following:

Recognize and appreciate the importance of emotion and reason when making feeding decisions for their dogs' health and wellness

Objectively rank the reliability of different types of nutrition advice and information and discern between evidence-based science and other forms of information

Research, read and understand published research studies that examine currently pertinent issues of canine nutrition

Discern between what is actually known about life stage nutrition versus what is conjecture, advertising hyperbole or marketing ploys

Identify advertising appeals and label claims that are commonly used by pet food companies to influence consumer purchases

Choose wisely using science-based evidence, an understanding of the pet food industry and its marketing ploys, specific aspects of dogs' age and health, and the owners' individual goals and personal values

Target Level of Knowledge

Prior to attending this session, it is assumed all attendees:

Already have a strong interest in nutrition and feeding management for dogs

Do not necessarily need to have a background or training in nutritional science

×

Canine Athlete or Canine Couch Potato? Feeding Dogs to Meet their Exercise Needs

Linda P. Case, MSPresenter

Linda P. Case, MS

Summary

This seminar begins with an examination of the prevalence of canine obesity, its associated health problems, and the importance of both diet and exercise in keeping dogs fit and healthy. We then review several types of dog sports and activities, including forms of exercise that owners participate in with their dogs. This section of the seminar includes an examination of the ways that exercise duration, intensity, and frequency impact a dog's metabolism and nutrient needs along with comparisons of the differences between endurance and sprint activities. Specific feeding management for dogs with different activity levels and lifestyles will also be discussed. In the second half of the seminar, we examine a variety of dog foods that are formulated and marketed as weight management diets and as performance diets. Attendees will learn to identify nutrient matrices that best match a dog's activity level and/or weight management needs and to compare and contrast commercial performance diets and diets designed to manage weight. Specific ingredients, nutrients and nutraceuticals that are promoted for aiding weight loss, cognitive performance, and athletic performance in dogs are examined in detail. Attendees will complete the seminar with a deeper understanding of the importance of nutrition and feeding management in maintaining a dog's optimal weight and condition and how to select a food that best fits the needs of the canine athlete, weekend warrior, or couch potato.

Learning Outcomes / Objectives

By the end of this session, attendees should be able to do the following:

Appreciate the prevalence of obesity and inactivity in pet dogs throughout the US and the health and quality of life implications of promoting training and exercise

Classify different types of dog sports and activities according to exercise duration, intensity, and frequency

Understand how different types of exercise impact dogs' nutrient and energy needs

Calculate a daily energy (calorie) estimate based upon a dog's age, life style, activity level and weight management needs

Identify key nutrients in performance dog foods and in weight management foods. Compare and contrast different commercial foods that are formulated for weight management or performance

Recognize and resist common marketing ploys used to promote weight management and performance diets

Choose wisely using an understanding of a dog's activity level, weight management needs, an understanding of the pet food industry and the types of foods that are available, and the owners' goals and personal values

Target Level of Knowledge

Prior to attending this session, it is assumed all attendees:

Have a strong interest in preventing canine obesity and in the importance of both exercise and diet for maintaining a healthy body condition in dogs.

May or may not be interested in canine sports

Are uncertain how to respond to questions from clients regarding weight management, activity level and exercise in dogs. 

×

Canine Social and Psychological Development

Gail FisherPresenter

Gail Fisher

Summary

The study of important times in a dog's life when intrinsic and extrinsic influences have the greatest impact on a dog's social and psychological development to maximize an individual's genetic potential. These include studying physical parameters, the development of body language, bonding, socialization, pack and play behavior, species-specific discipline, and normal behavioral changes throughout the dog's life. The course also covers puppy selection procedures designed to evaluate the temperament and personality of puppies for successful placement, and developing a puppy class curriculum.

Learning Outcomes / Objectives

By the end of this session, attendees should be able to do the following:

Define the critical and sensitive periods of development of the dog, from birth to maturity.

Describe the parameters, characteristics and impact of each period with strategies for a dog reaching its genetic potential.

Discuss Nature versus Nurture:  Identify the intrinsic and extrinsic influences on a dog's development—learned versus inherent behaviors, and the impact of the environment.

Perform Puppy Aptitude/Temperament Assessments to evaluate an individual puppy's inherent temperament and suitability for specific placement (family pet; special needs assistance; competitive dog sports, etc.)

Evaluate behavioral issues from the perspective of critical period deficiencies, and discuss strategies to overcome them.

Develop a curriculum for teaching puppy classes for ages 8 to 16 weeks.

Target Level of Knowledge

Prior to attending this session, it is assumed all attendees:

Have an interest in learning about the critical stages in the dog's life, their influence on future behavior, and ways to maximize a dog's genetic potential.

Have any level of skill, experience, or knowledge – from novice to expert – in any other topic relating to dogs

×

Living & Learning with Animals: The Science Behind Training & Application for Best Outcomes

Susan G. Friedman, Ph.D.Presenter

Susan G. Friedman, Ph.D.

Summary

This seminar focused on the fundamental principles of learning and behavior, and the behavior change technology known as applied behavior analysis. All animals change their behavior due to experience, i.e., they learn, which gives this course trans-species, and interdisciplinary relevance to all professionals working with behavior. Topics are presented with slides and illustrative videos and include the following: How Behavior Works: Understanding and Misunderstanding Behavior; The Significance of Science to Behavior Consulting; Respondent and Operant Learning; Functional Assessment; The Commitment to Ethical Practice; The Case for Empowerment; Procedures for Changing Respondent Behavior; Procedures for Changing Operant Behavior. As a result of attending this seminar, participants will be better able to teach learners effectively and humanely.

Learning Outcomes / Objectives

By the end of this session, attendees should be able to do the following:

The participant will be able to describe the relevance of science to training.

The participant will be able to explain how the different science models view behavior.

The participant will be able to distinguish respondent from operant learning.

The participant will be able to explain the ethical hierarchy of procedural choice and why effectiveness alone is not enough.

The participant will be able to cite some research supporting that control is a primary reinforcer.

The participant will be able to write ABC assessments of behavior snapshots.

The participant will be able explain the characteristics of effective positive reinforcement and use it more effectively.

The participant will be able to explain when intermittent schedules of reinforcement should be used and why they should be used only rarely.

The participant will be able to explain at least seven problems with punishment.

The participant will be able to explain and use alternatives to punishment more effectively.

Target Level of Knowledge

Prior to attending this session, it is assumed all attendees:

Have any level of training or consultation experience

Who are new to the industry have little to no knowledge about how behavior-change works is necessary

Who are veterans of the industry looking to further develop a behavior science base to support their current application of behavior change technology.

×

Build a Better Trainer Part 1 - Your Training Dogs but you are Teaching Humans

Sumac Grant-JohnsonPresenter

Sumac Grant-Johnson

Summary

This session will focus on skills necessary to be an effective teacher of humans in a dog class setting. Learn how to use Speed Teaching techniques and Observe/Interpret/Act to help you make the most of your classroom time. Included will be human behavior and body language, learning styles, teaching methods, group dynamics, motivation and subtle marking techniques to use on your human students. These tools along with the use of humor for putting students at ease will have your students reaching their goals, coming back for more and spreading the word about your classes.

This session will be a combination of lecture, action and observation. This will include participants working in teams with fellow participants performing exercises and tasks that will offer hands on experience, observation and review of the skills included in this session. 

Learning Outcomes / Objectives

By the end of this session, attendees should be able to do the following:

Practice using Observe/Interpret/Act with the human portion of the team quickly and effectively

Recognize how and when to make use of subtle mark and reward techniques for humans

Determine how to implement creative teaching techniques like "Change the Picture" and humor to facilitate happy students that reach their goals promptly

Target Level of Knowledge

Prior to attending this session, it is assumed all attendees:

Have no skills - or weak skills - in the foundation blocks of teaching people in a dog class setting effectively

Have at least a basic understanding of marker training and positive reinforcement

Are seasoned instructor seeking to refresh or reinvigorate their teaching (recommended but not required)

×

Build a Better Trainer Part 2 - and then there were Two, Teaching the Canine/Human Team

Sumac Grant-JohnsonPresenter

Sumac Grant-Johnson

Summary

Night one - You have a classroom full of humans with limited skills, distracted dogs and maybe even a dose of chaos. It is your task to help these diverse and complex teams build their working relationship, teach several skills and help them utilize these skills to perform a variety of behaviors successfully. And you only have an hour with them each week over a few weeks time. WOW!

The knowledge and skills needed to be a great instructor go far beyond canine behavior and how to train specific exercises. Great instructors have huge teacher toolboxes and can implement skills like Observe/Interpret/Act and "Change the Picture" in seconds. Great classrooms are settings conducive to learning for each human and canine in attendance. Great training evenings are filled with teams enjoying creative exercises and moving towards the class objectives as rapidly as possible.

This session will be a combination of lecture, action and observation. This will include participants playing the roles of handler and dog while working through simulations of classroom situations, exercises and games. Participants will be able to see and experience how the skills offered in this session are implemented in the rapid pace needed for teaching weekly classes.

Learning Outcomes / Objectives

By the end of this session, attendees should be able to do the following:

Enhance their ability to utilize the following skills:

Apply Observe/Interpret/Act and Change the Picture for multiple complex human/canine teams

Implement Speed Teaching and subtle mark and reward techniques to take teams to their goals as rapidly as possible

Create classes filled with effective and creative games that make the classroom experience enjoyable and satisfying

Target Level of Knowledge

Prior to attending this session, it is assumed all attendees:

Already have knowledge and experience with marker training and positive reinforcement

Already have at least a foundation knowledge of dog behavior including fear and arousal

Should have some experience teaching basic skills

Are seasoned instructors seeking to reinvigorate their teaching and or redesigning their class curriculum (recommended but not required)

Have already attended Build a Better Instructor Part 1– Your Training Dogs but you are Teaching Humans (recommended but not required)

×

Finding the Courage: A Step-by-Step Guide to Starting Your Dog Training Business

Denisa Dee Hoult, MBA, CPDT, CTDIPresenter

Dee Hoult

Summary

So you think you have what it takes to be a dog trainer, but you're concerned about how to proceed and be financially successful as a business owner. Perhaps you have completed the APDT certificate course "Dog Training 101: What All Beginning Trainers Should Know with Sarah Filipiak" and are looking for the next step. Look no further! This course will teach you the ins and outs, the ups and downs, and the nitty gritty of running a successful dog training business. From marketing, to budgeting, from liability to people skills, and everything in between attendees of this course will walk away with a great deal of knowledge. Because this course is an APDT Hybrid course, four weeks of education takes place online, while the final day of this course takes place in person, during the 2013 APDT Conference! To receive credit, full students must complete both the on-line and in-person portions. Auditing students are not required to do so.

Learning Outcomes / Objectives

By the end of this session, attendees should be able to do the following:

Feel inspired in regards to starting their own dog training business

Gain the tools and knowledge relevant to running a successful dog training business

Have a realistic expectation of what the first year flying solo is like

Target Level of Knowledge

Prior to attending this session, it is assumed all attendees:

are thinking of becoming a dog trainer or have just starting out

Does not know this information

Recently completed the APDT Course "Dog Training 101: What All Beginning Trainers Should Know" (recommended but not required)

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The Application, Mechanics and Benefits of Trick Dog Training

Denisa Dee Hoult, MBA, CPDT, CTDIPresenter

Dee Hoult

Summary

This presentation is best suited as a workshop where attendees can gain hands on experience teaching the most popular dog tricks. I have experienced that what keeps dog trainer's from incorporating tricks into their training program is the mechanics of trick training as well of lack of skill in shaping behavior. The workshop would start off with some training foundations and theory (via PowerPoint/lecture format) and then lead into a hands-on portion for "Handler" attendees to improve their mechanical skills working with dogs, while "Observer" attendees watch the action. The workshop would conclude with another short PowerPoint session or round-table forum where we could talk about why trick training is so beneficial and how to pitch it to clients. There will also be time during this workshop for Handlers to demonstrate their new skills to each other, and help each other problem solve in a positive and supportive manner. The instructor will also discuss how different tricks can be used in reactive dog work as well as fearful dog work.

Learning Outcomes / Objectives

By the end of this session, attendees should be able to do the following:

Gain hands on experience in luring/shaping the most popular dog tricks clients ask for

Realize the applications of using tricks in behavior modification work

Develop strategies to engage your clients with the idea of trick dog training and it's applications in obedience, behavior, aggression work, and every-day dog training

Target Level of Knowledge

Prior to attending this session, it is assumed all attendees:

Have experience with clicker/marker training.

    Not sure? On a scale of 1-5, 5 being excellent and 1 being little if any knowledge, how would you rate your use of a clicker in dog training?

    If you said 3+, this seminar is appropriate for you

Have a basic understanding of luring and shaping behavior.

    Not sure? On a scale of 1-5, 5 being your level of confidence please assess yourself based on the following: I can teach any dog to retrieve!

    If you said 5, your skills are likely too advanced for this workshop

Are not currently offering or familiar with trick dog training or have a very limited trick "vocabulary."

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Dog Training: From Where We Came to Where We Are Going

Ken McCortPresenter

Ken McCort

Summary

Closing the conference, I will give attendees a presentation about how dog training began and what I believe will be necessary to be a good trainer and behavior consultant in the future.

Learning Outcomes / Objectives

By the end of this session, attendees should be able to do the following:

Understanding the methods and equipment used to train dogs in the past

Looking at training methods and devices used to help train dogs in the present

Describing what the future of training may be like and what trainers may need to know

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A Crash Course in "Cat"!

Jacqueline Munera, CCBC, PCBC, CAP2Presenter

Jacqueline Munera, CCBC, PCBC, CAP2

Summary

Many canine professionals are uncomfortable working with cats because they don't understand the communication signals of the species or they don't know how to recognize when a cat is in need of help. Some are just, well, nervous around cats!  Other canine professionals would love to add cats to their consulting repertoire but don't know if there is a market for it. However, cats are now the most popular pet in America which means most dog trainers and consultants will meet up with at least a few cats if they do in-home consults. People with either cat-only or multispecies households are now demanding the same services for their cat family members as they have for their dogs. Additionally, the growth of reward based training techniques has paved the way for busting the 'Cats can't be trained' myth.  Impress your clients and expand your clientele by winning over those cats!

In this session, we will learn and practice appropriate ways to interact with a cat and how to recognize what a cat is 'saying' about a situation. We will explore what cats need for a happy life and cat-dog integration strategies. We will also identify and practice fun foundation skills to teach cats and explore tech applications that can make your car consulting more effective.  We will have cats at this workshop and, if the cats are amenable to our plan, "handler" attendee partners will work directly with cats, while "observer" students play an important role during and after the interactions.

This presentation will enable canine behavior professionals to be more effective with interspecies training and behavior protocols, and help them feel more comfortable interacting with client's cats.

Learning Outcomes / Objectives

By the end of this session, attendees should be able to do the following:

Explore some basics of cat social and communicative behavior

Explore some environmental, physical and mental health needs of domestic cats

Identify and practice foundation skills to teach cats

Discover and discuss ways to incorporate user-friendly technology to improve, expand, and enhance consultations and services to include cats

Participate in cat-dog case studies

Target Level of Knowledge

Prior to attending this session, it is assumed all attendees:

Have at least an intermediate understanding of and hands-on experience with behavior consulting (any species)

Have at least intermediate knowledge and hands-on experience with in-home behavior consulting

Understand the basics of operant learning, including the four quadrants & marker training

Understand the basics of respondent conditioning, including counter conditioning & systematic desensitization

Are comfortable using basic technology (internet and video techniques)

Have little to no knowledge of cat behavior beyond a basic level

Are not currently offering cat behavior consultations beyond a beginning level

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Do you see what I see: Medical problems masquerading as behavioral problems

Christopher Pachel, DVM, DACVBPresenter

Christopher Pachel, DVM, DACVB

Summary

As a veterinarian, clinical experience tells us that the majority of pet owner observations are in some way related to behavior.  For example, "my cat isn't as playful as he used to be", "my dog is really hungry lately", or "my pet isn't jumping onto the bed as easily as she used to". 

Did you also know that many of the concerns that may cause a dog owner to seek out the help of a trainer could also be signs of underlying medical issues?  For example, a dog that is hesitant to navigate the weave poles or is reluctant to go for rides in the car might be experiencing orthopedic pain or discomfort.  A dog that is showing aggression toward their owner might be suffering from an ear infection, a dog that is difficult to housetrain might have a urinary tract infection or be affected by incontinence, and a dog that is licking surfaces excessively might have ulcers or acid reflux problems? 

These and other medical problems masquerading as behavioral problems will be covered, along with some of the signs that you may notice while training or during a behavior assessment.  This presentation will also cover some of the ways in which you can discuss these issues with your clients without stepping on the toes of the pet's veterinarian, and how to bring these observations to the attention of the dog's veterinarian in a professional and respectful manner. 

Learning Outcomes / Objectives

By the end of this session, attendees should be able to do the following:

Identify common behavioral problems that may require additional medical assessment by the dog's veterinarian

Develop methods for bringing your observations to the attention of the pet owner and to the primary care veterinarian in a professional manner

Target Level of Knowledge

Prior to attending this session, it is assumed all attendees:

Have little to no understanding of medical issues that affect canine behavior patterns

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How to achieve a successful outcome: it's about more than giving good recommendations!

Christopher Pachel, DVM, DACVBPresenter

Christopher Pachel, DVM, DACVB

Summary

Every dog that you train comes with at least one family member who will be responsible for implementing your recommendations.  For better or for worse, achieving a successful outcome through training and behavior modification is about so much more than training the dog!  The "human element" side of dog training requires you to recognize, navigate, and accommodate the patterns that affect the client's ability to implement the plan that you give. 

This workshop will explore many of those barriers to success using a case-based format that will challenge you to think about problems in new ways.  Specific topics will include navigating issues of anthropomorphism and anthropocentrism, identifying client strengths rather than faults, evaluating the physical environment for obstacles to success, and responding appropriately to sensitive information that is shared by clients. 

Through small and large group discussion, you will learn to recognize communication patterns, partner more effectively with your clients, develop dialogues for navigating common situations, empower your clients to implement your recommendations, and ultimately be more successful in your business. 

Learning Outcomes / Objectives

By the end of this session, attendees should be able to do the following:

Recognize common client communication patterns

Navigate issues of anthropomorphism and anthropocentrism

Identify and capitalize on client strengths

Evaluate physical and social environments for barriers to success

Practice responses to sensitive information shared by clients

Empower your clients to take ownership of recommendations

Target Level of Knowledge

Prior to attending this session, it is assumed all attendees:

Are already familiar with process of gathering information from clients and formulating a behavior modification plan

Have moderate to extensive experience with coaching clients through training and/or behavior modification exercises

Be respectful of others in a group discussion environment

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Don't Worry - Dogs Love Me! Working with Human Reactive Dogs 101

Emma Parsons, CDBC, BAPresenter

Emma Parsons, CDBC, BA

Summary

Dogs that are aggressive present the most serious canine behavioral problem. Having a dog that has the potential to seriously injure a person (or another dog) is a huge liability risk not to mention the emotional turmoil that his guardian will suffer. Although aggression cannot be cured, with careful management and effective clicker training strategies, the guardian can minimize the risk that the dog will ever harm someone again.

Sooner or later, every trainer encounters a request to work with an aggressive dog. But how do you know if you are ready? Assuming you are, where do you begin, what do you work on and when? This workshop will help you determine if you are ready to handle aggression cases, then teach you how to do it. Work hands-on with fellow human attendees as well and friendly dogs as you discover how to manage aggression cases, work with and support the stressed out owners who share their lives with an aggressive dog, and how to successfully address aggression cases. This workshop will focus on in-home, private consultations and will utilize friendly dogs, for the safety and well-being of everyone involved.

Learning Outcomes / Objectives

By the end of this session, attendees should be able to do the following:

Assess whether they are truly ready to take on aggression cases

Develop complete rehabilitation plans for human-or-dog reactive/aggressive dogs in a private consultation setting

Review processes for repairing often damaged relationships between the owner and the dog.

Recognize how to establish appropriate thresholds in which each dog needs to work.

Target Level of Knowledge

Prior to attending this session, it is assumed all attendees:

Are familiar with clicker training techniques

Have a basic understanding of canine body signals

Have a basic understanding of learning theory principles

Are comfortable and effective when communicating with students

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Don't Worry - Dogs Love Me! Working with Human Reactive Dogs 201

Emma Parsons, CDBC, BAPresenter

Emma Parsons, CDBC, BA

Summary

Dogs that are aggressive present the most serious canine behavioral problem. Having a dog that has the potential to seriously injure a person (or another dog) is a huge liability risk not to mention the emotional turmoil that his guardian will suffer. Although aggression cannot be cured, with careful management and effective clicker training strategies, the guardian can minimize the risk that the dog will ever harm someone again.

Once a professional has gained experience working with aggressive dogs and their owners in a private, in-home consultation setting, it is not unusual to want to take their services to the next level. This workshop will walk you through the nuts and bolts offering group classes for reactive dogs. Learn how to set up the space, keep dogs safe and below threshold, manage human students, what to teach and when, and how to ensure classes are under control and successful. This workshop will provide hands-on opportunities to work with human and canine students. This workshop will incorporate friendly dogs to ensure both humans and dogs are safe and in an appropriate, low-stress environment.

Learning Outcomes / Objectives

By the end of this session, attendees should be able to do the following:

Assess whether they are truly ready to address aggression in a group class setting

Develop complete rehabilitation plans for human-or-dog reactive/aggressive dogs in a group setting

Review processes for repairing often damaged relationships between the owner and the dog.

Recognize how to establish appropriate thresholds in which each dog needs to work.

Target Level of Knowledge

Prior to attending this session, it is assumed all attendees:

Have successfully resolved human reactive dog cases via in-home training OR have attended "Don't Worry - Dogs Love Me! 101: Working with Human Reactive Dogs" (recommended but not required)

Are familiar with clicker training techniques

Have a basic understanding of canine body signals

Have a basic understanding of learning theory principles

Are comfortable and effective when communicating with students

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Close Your Mouth and Open Your Eyes! Behavioral Observations in the Field

Sue SternbergPresenter

Sue Sternberg

Summary

From observation—and only observation—comes interpretation. It is in the field, observing real, live dogs, that we can attain a better, more objective understanding of dogs. I will be taking a group of trainers into the field to observe and study dog-dog engagements, with the intent of compiling an ethogram (behavior catalog) of observed dog-dog behaviors. . A brief lecture and discussion will precede the excursion and trainers will be assigned (as well as asked to come up with their own) behaviors to count and collect.  I will pose several questions I would like for participants to think about during their observations. The day will end with lecture, debriefing, and video viewing, in real time and slow motion, of selected footage taken throughout the day. Data will be shared and trainers will be asked to produce their own observations, theories, interpretations and conclusions for discussion.

Learning Outcomes / Objectives

By the end of this session, attendees should be able to do the following:

Create an ethogram (behavior catalog) of common, discrete behaviors that occur when dogs engage with other dogs in a group setting

Compile a list of possible play cues/signals—based on our own observations—not what we THINK we know or have been told

Either have a better understanding (or more questions) on what is the definition of dog 'play' and why dogs engage.

Target Level of Knowledge

Prior to attending this session, it is assumed all attendees:

Have already observed some dog-dog engagements, whether at a dog park, day care, or for shelter dog exercise groups

Are experienced dog professional, with existing knowledge of and experience canine behavior.

Are advanced dog professionals (content will not be appropriate for those "new" to the industry.)

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The Human Half of Dog Training: Foundations for Working Effectively with People to Benefit Their Dogs

Risë VanFleet, PhD, RPT-S, CDBCPresenter

Risë VanFleet, PhD, RPT-S, CDBC

Summary

"When we work with dogs, we inevitably work with their people, and therein lies the real challenge for most canine professionals." (VanFleet).

What happens with human clients greatly impacts what happens with their dogs, and as most canine professionals will attest, working with people is often the most difficult part of the job! This workshop offers effective and practical skills for engaging clients, overcoming resistance, creating collaborative relationships, and applying a variety of interpersonal skills and strategies that work well for those involved in virtually any canine-related profession.

Drawn from the presenter's decades of work with parents and children as well as dogs and their families, this workshop expands on her award-winning book to include critical features such as tone of voice, body language, and setting a collaborative tone--aspects of human interaction that lend themselves to a workshop setting more than to the written word! The workshop includes a PowerPoint-based lecture interspersed with live and video demonstrations of the approaches used. Small-group skills-building activities followed by discussions enhance participants' ability to work enthusiastically and effectively with their human clients for the sake of the dogs. The workshop covers key skills in a fun and nonthreatening learning environment.

Learning Outcomes / Objectives

By the end of this session, attendees should be able to do the following:

define resistance in the context of dog training.

adopt collaborative attitudes and behaviors in their work with human clients.

use the skill of empathic listening to understand and engage clients fully.

explain the role of cognitive dissonance in dog training, and how to overcome it.

identify at least 3 dog-training skills that can be adapted for use with people.

provide positive and specific feedback to clients to enhance their skills with their dogs.

restate any criticism into a more tactful suggestion for improvement.

monitor their own tone of voice in interactions with other people.

handle at least three challenging client situations that interfere with getting the job done.

access other resources to further build their competence and confidence in interacting effectively with people in canine-related work.

Target Level of Knowledge

Prior to attending this session, it is assumed all attendees:

Have a thorough understanding of reinforcement-based dog training methods.

Have at least 1 year of experience working with humans (in any profession or role)

Are novice or advanced dog trainers

Understand this session is a foundation level focus on human interaction skills rather than dog training skills.

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A Short History of Man's Best Friend

Clive D. L. Wynne, Ph.D.Presenter

Clive D. L. Wynne, Ph.D.

Summary

I have spent the last five years traveling the world trying to understand the mysterious origins of dogs. At first I believed those who said that people created dogs by selecting tame wolves to help them hunt. Then I spoke to people who know wolves and realized you could never take one hunting. Then I believed those who told me dogs arose when people started agriculture and wolves that lingered around our trash became dogs. But then I spoke to archeologists who have evidence of dogs from before agriculture started. The idea of dogs as trash scavengers is also difficult to reconcile with the intimate space they occupy in human homes. Now I have finally cracked how dogs came to be – a process that involved multiple steps over thousands of years. A process I call, "The Genesis of Dogs in Seven Days."

Learning Outcomes / Objectives

By the end of this session, attendees should be able to do the following:

Appreciate that there is a mystery surrounding the origin of the dog

Understand the limitations of existing theories of the origins of dogs

Assess "The Genesis of Dogs in Seven Days."

Target Level of Knowledge

Prior to attending this session, it is assumed all attendees:

Have little or no prior knowledge

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Using Behavioral Science to Help Dogs in Difficult Situations

Clive D. L. Wynne, Ph.D.Presenter

Clive D. L. Wynne, Ph.D.

Summary

At any one time, more than one in ten of all the dogs in the United States are living in shelters. And of those millions of dogs, reliable statistics are very hard to come by, but roughly half will not leave alive. I shall outline some of the projects my students and I have developed to try and improve the welfare of dogs living in shelters, to improve the rates of adoption from shelters, and to reduce the rate of return of dogs to shelters.

Learning Outcomes / Objectives

By the end of this session, attendees should be able to do the following:

Appreciate the magnitude of the shelter dog problem

Understand diverse approaches to improving outcomes for shelter dogs

Target Level of Knowledge

Prior to attending this session, it is assumed all attendees:

Are familiar with principles of operant conditioning

No other prior knowledge assumed.

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Connecting with Traumatized Dogs: Patience, Play, and Positive Interventions to Help Unsocialized and Terrified Canines

Risë VanFleet, PhD, RPT-S, CDBCPresenter

Risë VanFleet, PhD, RPT-S, CDBC

Summary

Increasingly, research suggests that dogs can be traumatized in much the same way that humans are. Traumatized dogs may present as terrified, extremely avoidant, frozen in place, and hypervigilant, often refusing to eat. They can be a flight risk, climbing fences or crashing through gates, all in an effort to avoid human contact. Some are feral or semi-feral; others have had abusive experiences.  Often, they lack socialization and positive contact with humans, and their life experiences create extreme fear reactions. They are not candidates for positive reinforcement training because they won't take treats and they stay as far away as possible. Their fear overrides interaction with people. This workshop discusses the challenges in working with these dogs and offers a variety of tools that have been shown to be effective in gradually overcoming their fear and helping them realize their potential. Specific methods to build more positive associations with humans are detailed, with particular emphasis on the role of play in the rehabilitation of these dogs.

The role of dog-dog free play, the involvement of another dog as a social facilitator, and ways of incorporating human-dog play into the relationship will be covered. This approach draws on the principles of play therapy used with human children, and it has been used successfully with many dogs who had not responded well to other methods of rehabilitation. The workshop focuses on a variety of specific methods, provides case studies, and illustrates the approach with video and demonstration. At the end, participants will have time to discuss some of their own cases in a relaxed learning environment.

Learning Outcomes / Objectives

By the end of this session, attendees should be able to do the following:

define 4 presenting characteristics of traumatized dogs.

explain why operant conditioning methods often do not work with traumatized dogs.

explain the role of safety in working with traumatized dogs.

identify at least 3 characteristics of a social facilitation dog.

define what is meant by dog-dog free play and how it is used in helping traumatized dogs.

supervise dog-dog free play to help these dogs.

engage in dog-human play designed to build positive connection with these dogs.

develop a treatment plan for traumatized dogs residing in shelters, rescues, foster homes, and adoptive homes.

Target Level of Knowledge

Prior to attending this session, it is assumed all attendees:

Have a thorough understanding of classical conditioning and operant conditioning.

Are not new to dog training / are intermediate or advanced trainers

Are well-acquainted with classical and operant conditioning.

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Observations from the Field—Dog-Dog Interactions

Sue SternbergPresenter

Sue Sternberg

Summary

How much dog-dog socialization is truly necessary for the health and well-being of a puppy or adult dog? Is play between dogs important to their overall mental and behavioral health? If so, why? What kind of play? How much play? How much exposure to unfamiliar dogs should one dog experience? If we raise and try to teach our puppies not to mouth/bite our skin and clothes, how come we raise our puppies to mouth and bite other dogs?

After spending the last few years filming engagements between unfamiliar and familiar dogs, I have many observations that make me challenge some of the mores and prevailing beliefs inherent in the dog world. While I can offer few answers, the questions that have arisen from studying, particularly in slow motion, hundreds of hours of video footage of dog-dog interactions, pose fascinating quandaries about what I thought I knew,  and merit discussion. Join me for an in-depth look at dog-dog engagement. I will be showing footage of healthy play, risky play, and engagements that I believe LOOK like play but are instead what I believe is practice for violence and harm. Or is that what play is?  I will be showing footage of low risk, medium risk and high risk behaviors, and make recommendations on how and when to interrupt to avoid violent engagements.

Learning Outcomes / Objectives

By the end of this session, attendees should be able to do the following:

Teach participants to be objective observers of dogs

Identify behaviors to use in future interactions with dogs to make classes, lessons, diagnoses and prognoses better.

To go from being a good trainer to a GREAT trainer.

Particularly relevant to those running puppy classes, or offering day care or free play.

Target Level of Knowledge

Prior to attending this session, it is assumed all attendees:

Are highly experienced trainers and/or behavior consultants

Run day cares, shelter dog play groups, or offer off-leash play times in their classes (recommended by not required)

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New Concepts for the Prevention and Treatment of Dog Aggression

Dr. Ian Dunbar, PhD, MRCVSPresenter

Dr. Ian Dunbar, PhD, MRCVS

Summary

People are always surprised when later in life, their friendly and socialized puppy becomes shy, standoffish, wary, fearful, reactive and aggressive towards people or other dogs, even though developing fear of the unfamiliar later in life is a normal and adaptive development process. 

These problems can be easily prevented with lots of early socialization and ongoing classical conditioning.  For older dogs that are past the Critical Period of Socialization, the treatment protocols are virtually identical to prevention protocols (classical and operant conditioning, progressive desensitization and socialization), except that they are more complicated, take much longer and are sometimes dangerous. 

Recently though, new techniques have been developed to accelerate and maximize classical conditioning, progressive desensitization and ultimately, re-socialization. Differential classical conditioning (DCC) enables trainers to operantly condition at the same time as classically condition the dog. Set-ups accelerate classical conditioning and using kibble and tug toys (fairly low-value primary reinforcers) empowered as the highest-value mega-secondary reinforcers maximizes classical conditioning.

Learning Outcomes / Objectives

By the end of this session, attendees should be able to do the following:

  1. Compare and contrast early socialization protocols for young dogs with treatment protocols for addressing fear and aggression in older dogs
  2. Evaluate how differential classical conditioning (DCC) and set-ups to accelerate classical conditioning
  3. Compare and contrast low-value primary reinforcers and highest-value mega-secondary reinforcers

Target Level of Knowledge

Prior to attending this session, it is assumed all attendees:

  1. Are not new to the industry of professional dog training
  2. Have a base understating of learning theory, operant, and classical conditioning
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Isn't It Time for Applied Learning Theory

Dr. Ian Dunbar, PhD, MRCVSPresenter

Dr. Ian Dunbar, PhD, MRCVS

Summary

In today's dog training, there is much more management and less reliability than 10-plus years ago - there is so much that we used to do in the 80s and 90s that we are no longer doing. When training doesn't work that well, people will search for alternative methods, often with the (usually false) assumption that aversive treatment is better for resolving behavior problems and producing greater reliability than a reward–based program.

Pet dog training is in dire need of re-invention. Most owners quickly master the beginning steps of training, but few manage to finish the job and produce a confident and friendly adult dog that is under verbal off-leash control without the continued use of training aids.

This seminar will revitalize the spirit and soul of dog training in this sterile quantum world of clicks and kibble and jerks and shocks. We will discuss when and how to phasing out the necessity of lures (within the first session) and rewards, many owners continue using food and toy lures plus clicks and food rewards for ever. Lures quickly become bribes and soon, attention and compliance become dependent on the owner having food or a clicker in their hand or pocket.

Learning Outcomes / Objectives

By the end of this session, attendees should be able to do the following:

  1. Recognize when and how to phase out lures & rewards within the first session
  2. Become an instructor who's clients do not become dependent on having food or a clicker

Target Level of Knowledge

Prior to attending this session, it is assumed all attendees:

  1. Are somewhat new to the industry of professional dog training
  2. Have an introductory understating of learning theory, operant, and classical conditioning
  3. Are struggling to quickly phase out lures & rewards
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Panel Discussion: Trauma and Fear

Presenters

Patricia McConnell
Risë VanFleet
Gail Fisher
Janis Bradley

Summary

Join us for an interactive discussion with this esteemed panel of professionals, each of whom brings a unique perspective to the topic. We begin by hearing from each panelist as they discuss their own experiences: what they've learned over their careers, how the topic has impacted their own pets, how they've handled cases, what has surprised them most, and more. Next, a lively discussion between panel members will highlight where they may agree, may disagree, or how each might handle a scenario. Finally, stick around for or participate in a live Q&A session with the audience and panel.

This panel discussion will focus on the various forms trauma may take, how it can impact dogs at various developmental stages, short-term and long-term prognosis, what fear looks like, and more. Listen to multiple perspectives on how to help humans facing fearful behavior, and how we can make life a little less scary for companion dogs.

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Panel Discussion: Talkers and Barkers, Lungers and Disrupters: Managing the Humans AND Dogs in Group Classes

Presenters

Emma Parsons
Robin Bennett
Susan Briggs
Gail Fisher
Sue Sternberg

Summary

Join us for an interactive discussion with this esteemed panel of professionals, each of whom brings a unique perspective to the topic. We begin by hearing from each panelist as they discuss their own experiences: what they've learned over their careers, how the topic has impacted their own pets, how they've handled cases, what has surprised them most, and more. Next, a lively discussion between panel members will highlight where they may agree, may disagree, or how each might handle a scenario. Finally, stick around for or participate in a live Q&A session with the audience and panel.

This panel discussion will focus on the aspects of group class that can be most challenging: the dogs and the humans who disrupt everything! The giggling humans who aren't listening, dogs who won't stop barking, dogs lunging at each other, humans who consume your time and attention, and more. Learn tips from highly experienced group class instructors on how to keep things under control.

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Panel Discussion: Dogs from the Inside Out

Presenters

Robert Gillette
Linda Case
Christopher Pachel
Susan Friedman
Ray Coppinger

Summary

Join us for an interactive discussion with this esteemed panel of professionals, each of whom brings a unique perspective to the topic. We begin by hearing from each panelist as they discuss their own experiences: what they've learned over their careers, how the topic has impacted their own pets, how they've handled cases, what has surprised them most, and more. Next, a lively discussion between panel members will highlight where they may agree, may disagree, or how each might handle a scenario. Finally, stick around for or participate in a live Q&A session with the audience and panel.

This panel discussion will examine how what it going on inside of a dog can impact what we see on the outside. Topics such as medical problems that look like behavioral problems, behavioral problems that exacerbate health problems, the influence of nutrition, undiagnosed injuries, and more may be addressed.

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Redefining the Dog Training Professional: Putting the APDT to Work For You

Teoti Anderson, CPDT-KAPresenters

Teoti Anderson, CPDT-KA

Summary

It used to be enough to print some business cards to launch a dog training business. While that still exists, today's dog trainer needs to do a lot more to attract and keep clients to stay in business. How do you compete? Be redefining what it means to be a dog training professional. The APDT has tremendous resources beyond the conference to help you.

Learn how you can take advantage of discounts, handouts, products and services to elevate your dog training business. Get practical tips on improving your communication and presence in order to leave a positive impression in your community. Are you a volunteer trainer with a local shelter or rescue? A new trainer just starting a business? A veteran trainer looking for a business polish? We'll explore professionalism from all these angles to show you in the best possible light!

Teoti Anderson, APDT Past President and previous Dr. Ian Dunbar APDT Member of the Year Award winner, will share personal stories of how the APDT has impacted her life as a dog training professional, and how you can put the APDT to work for you.

Learning Outcomes / Objectives

By the end of this session, attendees should be able to do the following:

Create a modern definition of dog training professional.

Explore the various resources available to members by the APDT.

Target Level of Knowledge

Prior to attending this session, it is assumed all attendees:

Are already dog trainers, whether as volunteers or for profit

Have little or no understanding of resources available to APDT members

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Optimizing Canine Performance For Beginners

Dr. Robert GillettePresenters

Dr. Robert Gillette

Summary

This seminar will address introductory concepts of canine biomechanics, exercise physiology of athletic and working dogs as well as the metabolic effects of excitement and canine sports psychology. We will review basic components of the science of sports medicine and how it applies to canine performance.

Learning Outcomes / Objectives

By the end of this session, attendees should be able to do the following:

Review to introductory concepts of optimizing performance

Recognize how to assess and evaluate the factors of canine performance

Assess how to apply these concepts to the management of performance or working dogs

Target Level of Knowledge

Prior to attending this session, it is assumed all attendees:

Have little to no experience with this

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Optimizing Canine Performance - Advanced

Dr. Robert GillettePresenters

Dr. Robert Gillette

Summary

This seminar will address more advanced concepts of canine biomechanics, exercise physiology of athletic and working dogs as well as the metabolic effects of excitement and canine sports psychology. We will review in-depth and detailed components of the science of sports medicine and how it applies to canine performance.

Learning Outcomes / Objectives

By the end of this session, attendees should be able to do the following:

Review to advanced concepts of optimizing performance

Recognize how to assess and evaluate the factors of canine performance

Assess how to apply these concepts to the management of performance or working dogs

Target Level of Knowledge

Prior to attending this session, it is assumed all attendees:

Have attended Optimizing Canine Performance 101 and/or already possess experience with this topic

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Advanced Behavior Techniques and Practices with Dr. Lore Haug

Presenters

Dr. Lore Haug, DVM, MS, DACVB, CPDT-KA, CABC

Summary

Dr. Lore Haug, DVM, MS, DACVB, CPDT-KA, CABC and frequent contributor to training and other internet chat lists, is offering a full day of video, hands-on exercises and lecture on working behavior cases, including Aggression, Separation Anxiety and Resource Guarding. The day will be divided into two halves and available as a half or full-day breakout. Practicing Behavior Consultants and trainers working behavior
cases will have the opportunity to work with Dr. Lore Haug in an intimate setting, with lecture, video and interactive exercises. Common serious behavioral issues such as Aggression, Separation Anxiety and Resource Guarding will be addressed. Those with ample experience as well as those just finding themselves working in behavior will benefit from the solid behavior modification plans, tactics, effective and efficient modes of resolving or working towards resolution of these often very tough cases.

This daylong event will be separated into morning and afternoon content. The afternoon content will build upon the morning content, but attendance as both is not mandatory.

Learning Outcomes / Objectives

After attending the morning session of this seminar, attendees should be able to:

  1. Outline a practical problem list for the pet and family situation
  2. Triage the problem list
  3. Outline a management and methodical behavior modification plan for the most critical aspects of
    the problem list, including short and long term goals
  4. Utilize historical factors and behavioral observations to assess need for medical or physiologic intervention

After attending the afternoon session of this seminar, attendees should be able to:

  1. Give thoughtfulness to shaping plans in increments small enough for owners to be successful
  2. Identify and implement initial control exercises
  3. Understand how to implement effective and methodical relaxation protocols (which includes d/cc)
  4. Intelligently and objectively discuss aspects of reinforcing "emotions"

Target Level of Knowledge

Prior to attending this session, it is assumed all attendees:

  1. Have extensive knowledge of and skill in dog training
  2. Have a thorough and working knowledge of basic behavior modification techniques
  3. Have successfully resolved basic undesirable behavior cases
  4. Are not new to dog training
  5. Are not new to behavior consulting
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Teoti Anderson, CPDT-KA

Teoti Anderson, CPDT-KA
Teoti Anderson, CPDT-KA

Teoti Anderson, CPDT-KA, KPA-CTP, is the owner of Pawsitive Results, L.L.C., which offers reward-based training for the family dog in Lexington, SC. A professional dog trainer for more than 19 years, she is the author of Your Outta Control Puppy, The Super Simple Guide to Housetraining, Quick & Easy Crate Training and Puppy Care and Training. She also is a regular columnist for Modern Dog magazine and has appeared in Southern Living, New York Times, DogFancy, Puppies USA, Whole Dog Journal and other national publications. A popular conference speaker, she has given presentations to pet owners and fellow trainers across the United States and in Japan.

Teoti served on the board of directors of the Association of Professional Dog Trainers (APDT) for six years, serving as President for three years. She also earned the APDT Dr. Ian Dunbar Member of the Year award. She is a founding member of the Carolinas Trainers Forum, a networking group of APDT trainers in North and South Carolina. Teoti serves as a consultant on canine training and behavior for local and national dog rescue groups. She also has been actively involved in animal-assisted therapy and activities with Pet Partners (formerly Delta Society). She shares her home with a Papillon and a Belgian Tervuren.

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Robin Bennett, CPDT-KA

Robin Bennett, CPDT-KA
Robin Bennett, CPDT-KA

Robin Bennett is a certified dog trainer, and an author and consultant for pet care facilities on the subjects of dog daycare, training, and off-leash dog play.  The tips you will pick up in her sessions stem from Robin's 20 years as a dog trainer and daycare owner. Her book All About Dog Daycare is the number one reference on owning a daycare, and Off-Leash Dog Play, co-authored by Susan Briggs is the key reference on supervising dogs in playgroups.

Robin has a passion for educating dog trainers and other professionals on safe handling techniques and canine body language with the Staff Training Program she developed with Susan Briggs called Knowing Dogs. Together Robin and Susan (better known as "The Dog Gurus") have recently launched the best resource for off-leash play at www.TheDogGurus.com.

Robin is an active member of the Association of Pet Dog Trainers (APDT) and has a B.A. degree from Roanoke College. She is a retired Colonel, United States Marine Corps Reserves, and is married with two children.

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Susan Briggs

Susan Briggs
Susan Briggs

Crystal Canine was founded to keep pet care the best job in the world!  After 12 years owning and operating Urban Tails, a large dog daycare, boarding, grooming and training center in Houston, TX Susan's passion transitioned to helping fellow pet care business owners.  As a recognized leader in the dog daycare industry her goal is to make all off-leash play programs safer.  The people she meets in this industry motivate her to make a difference by providing tools to make your job as a business owner easier. Using her educational background in accounting, study of social dog behavior and gifts for training others she creates programs and tools specifically designed for the pet industry.

Through her involvement in industry trade associations and work on creating the first industry standards, Susan met Robin Bennett, dog daycare expert. In 2007 they co-wrote Off-Leash Dog Play: A Complete Guide to Safety & Fun. The book was well-received and they responded to requests to create a staff training resource on dog language and safe off-leash playgroups. Knowing Dogs, uses the easy to learn traffic light signal classifications for dog behavior from their book with videos for a comprehensive "staff training in a box". 

njoying their work together and the positive feedback from business owners they continue to create new tools that will raise the bar of safety in off-leash dog play.  Robin and Susan want to make managing your off-leash play programs easier and have founded The Dog Gurus

Susan converted to a Texan and lives in Houston with partner Bill Kamps and three dogs, Sheppy, Archie and Lacey.  Her dogs continue to provide lessons on the complexity of canine health and behavior which has led her to become a student of natural and holistic pet care courses.

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Janis Bradley

Janis Bradley
Janis Bradley

Janis Bradley is the author of Dogs Bite, but balloons and slippers are more dangerous, the complete guide to research on dog bites, along with Dog Bites: Problems and Solutions for The Animals and Society Institute, and The Relevance of Breed in Selecting a Companion Dog for the National Canine Research Council.   Between 1999 and 2009, Bradley trained more than 400 professional pet dog trainers at the San Francisco SPCA's Academy for Dog Trainers, and now continues this work as the owner of the Dog Training Internship Academy. 

Bradley is the Associate Director of Communications and Publications at the National Canine Research Council whose mission is to support and distribute the best current science that can help enhance and protect the canine human bond.  She has spoken at numerous professional conferences. 

She lives in Oakland, California with her 2 rescued Greyhounds.

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Amber Burckhalter

Amber Burckhalter
Amber Burckhalter

Amber Burckhalter is a renowned expert in canine obedience and behavior modification. She has spent 20 years working with all types of dogs on pack mentality, behavior modification and all levels of obedience.

She is considered an expert in the canine aggression field, using positive training methods and, in addition to being the Owner and directing all K-9 Coach training activities, this is now her professional focus.

Amber has served as an expert witness in court proceedings and has been featured in the Atlanta Journal Constitution and other newspapers, both for her expert opinion and her call to action for other trainers.

She has appeared in Women's Day, Parents Magazine, The APDT Chronicle of the Dog, CNN.com and numerous other publications. Amber has also appeared on local television programs including Good Day Atlanta and in a WSB-TV Channel 2 exposé that profiled Norred and Associates and Amber's work with busting dog fighting rings and rehabilitating former fighting pitbull dogs.

In 2008, the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) named Amber 'Head Trainer' for the End Dog Fighting Campaign in Atlanta and she went on to co-design the curriculum for the nationwide HSUS program and log over 400 hours training and instructing at risk youth and their pit bulls in obedience, agility and behavior modification. She has appeared on National Public Radio and several other radio talk shows as a canine expert and is sought after by numerous organizations for her help using positive training methods to successfully train and rehab dogs.

She is proud to act as a mentor to other trainers and regularly hosts CEU approved educational conferences with world-renowned trainers.

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Linda P. Case, MS

Linda P. Case, MS
Linda P. Case, MS

Linda Case is a canine nutritionist, dog trainer, and science writer. She earned her B.S. in Animal Science at Cornell University and her M.S. in Canine/Feline Nutrition at the University of Illinois. Following graduate school, Linda was a lecturer in companion animal science in the Animal Sciences Department at the University of Illinois for 15 years and also taught companion animal behavior and training at the College of Veterinary Medicine. Linda currently owns AutumnGold Consulting and Dog Training Center in Mahomet, IL (http://www.autumngoldconsulting.com). AutumnGold Consulting provides scientific writing, training programs, seminars, and research support to pet food companies, animal advocacy organizations and the training center provides training classes to area dog owners. Linda is the author of numerous publications, including five books, most recently "Dog Food Logic: Making Smart Decisions for your Dog in an Age of Too Many Choices" (2014). She also authors the popular blog, "The Science Dog"  (http://thesciencedog.wordpress.com/) Linda and her husband Mike currently share their lives with four dogs; Cadie, Vinny, Chip, and Cooper, and Pete the cat. In addition to dog training, Linda enjoys running, hiking, swimming, yoga, and gardening – most of which she happily shares with her dogs.

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Dr. Raymond Coppinger

Dr. Raymond Coppinger
Dr. Raymond Coppinger

Raymond Coppinger, professor emeritus of biology, is a respected and sought-after lecturer who speaks around the world on ethology and behavioral ecology, especially involving canines. Coppinger's extensive research background has examined sled dog performance, working dogs for farmers and ranchers, assistance dogs, stray dogs, and much more. His work has played a significant role in establishing a greater understanding of the domestic dog, including early developmental behavior, social systems, domestication, evolution and more.

Ray (and his colleagues and students) have published over fifty papers on his dog research and numerous books, including DOGS: A Startling New Understanding of Canine Origin, Behavior, and Evolution, co-authored with Lorna Coppinger. His favorite publication, however, is the book Fishing Dogs, a humorous and iconoclastic look at dogs, fishermen and professors, with a second book on the subject just published.

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Gail Fisher

Gail Fisher
Gail Fisher

With over 40 years professional experience, Gail's background in dogs covers virtually all aspects of the field. A pioneer in many aspects of dog training, education and behavior, Gail developed the first University program for dog trainers and instructors in the world, a two-year certificate course, which she taught at the University of New Hampshire. Through her All Dogs Academy, she has continuously provided education and training for instructors and trainers for over 30 years. In 1976 Gail pioneered puppy classes for puppies as young as eight weeks. In 1993, she opened All Dogs Gym, pioneering the field of multi-dog interactive daycare. She founded and built All Dogs Gym, which is the largest dog activity center in the Northeast and one of the largest all-clicker-training programs in the country.

Gail is a past Board Member and President of the Association of Pet Dog Trainers (APDT). Gail's commitment to learning and sharing knowledge benefits dog owners, professionals and the dogs themselves. Her latest book, THE THINKING DOG—Crossover to Clicker Training is the quintessential manual for dog trainers interested in clicker training. She is also author of two award-winning books, training manuals, countless articles in major dog publications, and a weekly newspaper column. Gail's programs and seminars have earned her acclaim as an International presenter.

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Susan G. Friedman, Ph.D.

Susan G. Friedman, Ph.D.
Susan G. Friedman, Ph.D.

Susan G. Friedman, Ph.D., is a faculty member in the Department of Psychology at Utah State University. She has helped pioneer the cross-species application of behavior analysis to animals, using the same humane philosophy and scientifically sound teaching technology that has been so effective with human learners. She has written chapters in three veterinary texts, and her popular magazine articles have been translated into 12 languages (www.behaviorworks.org). She has given seminars on learning and behavior at conferences and zoos in many countries around the world. Teaching her on-line class for professionals, Living and Learning with Animals, has provided even wider dissemination of effective and humane behavior change practices.

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Dr. Robert Gillette

Dr. Robert Gillette
Dr. Robert Gillette

Dr. Robert Gillette is currently the Director of the Veterinary Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation program at the Veterinary Specialty Center in Buffalo Grove, IL. He received his D.V.M in 1988 from Kansas State University and earned an M.S.E. in Biomechanics in 1998 from the Human Performance Laboratory, College of Education, University of Kansas. His clinical interests include working with athletic and working dogs. This includes their training regimens, conditioning programs, injury prevention and breeding operations for performance dogs. It also includes canine sports medicine problems, including medical related performance problems, injury repair, rehabilitation and reconditioning.

He was previously the Director of the Animal Health & Performance Program in the College of Veterinary Medicine at Auburn University. He has authored 24 scientific publications and has authored/co-authored five chapters in Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation textbooks.

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Sumac Grant-Johnson, CPDT-KA

Sumac Grant-Johnson
Sumac Grant-Johnson, CPDT-KA

Sumac began training 40 ago and has been teaching professionally for 20. She is the owner of Wag It Training Center and the founder of Wag It Games. Sumac is a certified professional dog trainer and agility instructor. She is also a WCS Rally Judge, CGC, therapy dog and service dog evaluator. Sumac has been named Maine Dog trainer of the year and has appeared on Disney's "That's My Dog" and "Fetch" on PBS. She has been invited to present at Suzanne Clothiers Trainers Workshop and been a past presenter at the APDT conference. Sumac has been a contributor to Down East Dog News and Chronicle of the Dog. She was invited to be a part of Leadership Maine for her leadership capabilities and experience in small business.

Over the years Sumac has participated in a variety of dog sports and activities including obedience, rally, agility, tricks, herding, skijoring, scent games and water skills. Today she enjoys working with her two Border Collies and Golden Retriever mix.

Sumac has a fascination with "INSPIRING a desired behavior" in people as well as dogs. She combines her dog training knowledge, creativity and business training with her background in teaching personal growth workshops. This background enables her to bring together a unique that goes beyond dog training with a combination that includes training in human behavior, learning styles, teaching methods, group dynamics and motivation techniques.

Sumac offers seminars and instructors courses around the US and on line to an international market. Sumac runs Wag It Camps in NH and the Southern US as well as a variety of events at Wag It Training Center in Lincolnville Maine.

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Denisa Dee Hoult, MBA, CPDT, CTDI

Denisa Dee Hoult, MBA, CPDT, CTDI
Denisa Dee Hoult, MBA, CPDT, CTDI

Denisa Dee Hoult, MBA, CPDT, CTDI won her first pet tricks contest is 1987 with her first dog Babe, a border collie mix. She can still vividly remember her father picking out Babe from a litter of pups on relatives farm and putting the small black puppy into a carboard box. That car ride home with Babe would be the beginning of a lifelong passion for animals. It wasn't until completing her undergraduate degree in Marine Biology and a Masters in International Business that she turned her hobby of training dogs into business and career.

Dee currently serves as head trainer and CEO of Applause Your Paws, Inc., Miami's largest privately owned positive dog training company. Her company's mission is to help dog owners improve their quality of life through enjoyable, connected relationships with their canine companions by providing engaging, positive education and non-intimidating training so that in any environment they can have the well-behaved dog they always wanted. Although Dee dedicates her training time to helping clients with their canine behavior concerns, the thing she is most passionate about is developing her business. A large part of business development includes all of the networks that Dee is part of. In addition to managing her staff and assisting her own clients Dee is the founder of the APDT's Networking Group in South Florida, Miami Dade Animal Service's professional for canine evaluations and volunteer training, an Animal Behavior College Mentor, head trainer for Paws4You Rescue (a 501c3 mixed breed rescue) and recently stepped down from the four years she served on the Board of Directors for the South Florida Veterinary Medical Association & Foundation. Dee is what you could call a serial networker; If there is an opportunity to meet people and connect, you can be sure to find here there!

Dee shares her home with two cats, Sushi and Cheddar, three dogs: Zoe (Border Collie Mix), Oxford (Yellow Labrador), Marty McFly (Border Collie) and her English husband Sam. With her dogs she enjoys competitive canine sports including agility, frisbee, rally obedience, competition obedience, tricks, as well as week-long hiking, biking, camping and kayaking trips.

With a love for social media and blogging, you can follow Dee at @DoggieDeeva on Twitter, Friend Applause Your Paws on Facebook, or read her blog at www.applauseyourpaws.com

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Chris Lee

Chris Lee
Chris Lee

Chris Lee, is Senior Director of Information Technology at Rikter Corporation, a web development and design company headquartered in Atlanta. He is known for his high-energy and engaging lecture style.

He leads organizational teams that are responsible for the strategy, development, implementation, and business partner support of web and software applications— from the corporate environment to the non-profit organization sector.

Originally a television editor for ABC Television, Inc., Chris has been a professional web developer for over 17 years. He brings a vast and diverse background of design creativity, usability, and digital media into the web application medium. He regularly works with application development, software development, cloud, Microsoft .NET Framework, VB.NET, C#, jQuery, JSON, ASP.NET, HTML5, XML, CSS, ADO.NET, video production and editing, database design, and electronic newsletter automation.

He is also a specialist in the use of HTML5/CSS3/JavaScript responsive design technologies for web portal applications and corporate intranets, as well as mobile apps on iPhone and Android. He also regularly serves as a technical consultant for clients looking to incorporate additional web and newsletter strategies into their online presence. Chris regularly conducts lectures at seminars around the world and advises corporations on adopting a standards-based architecture for their web applications.

Chris resides in Atlanta, Georgia, with his wife, two children, and one amazing Shetland sheepdog.

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Patricia McConnell, PhD, CAAB

Patricia McConnell, PhD, CAAB
Patricia McConnell, PhD, CAAB

Patricia McConnell, PhD, CAAB is an Ethologist and Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist who has consulted with cat and dog lovers for over twenty-five years. She combines a thorough understanding of the science of behavior with years of practical, applied experience. Her nationally syndicated radio show, Calling All Pets, played in over 110 cities for fourteen years and her television show Petline played on Animal Planet for two and a half years. She is a frequent contributor to The Bark magazine ("the New Yorker of Dog Magazines") and is Adjunct Professor in Zoology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, teaching "The Biology and Philosophy of Human/Animal Relationships." Dr. McConnell is a much sought after speaker and seminar presenter, speaking to training organizations, veterinary conferences, academic meetings and animal shelters around the world about dog and cat behavior, and on science-based and humane solutions to serious behavioral problems. She is the author of numerous books on training and behavioral problems, as well as the critically acclaimed books The Other End of the Leash (translated now into 14 languages), For the Love of a Dog and Tales of Two Species. Patricia lives with her Border Collie Willie, her Cavalier Tootsie and a very spoiled flock of sheep, and suffers from separation anxiety when she leaves them. For more information, go to www.patriciamcconnell.com or visit her blog, at www.theotherendoftheleash.com.

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Ken McCort

Ken McCort
Ken McCort

Ken McCort owns and operates "Four Paws" training center in Doylestown, Ohio. Along with his wife, Marilyn, a veterinarian, he has and does live with multiple animals including dogs (multiple breed types including New Guinea Singing Dogs), cats, birds (parrots and other species), lizards, llamas, goats, a pony, a marmoset, mini horses and a donkey. In his profession, he works with owners and their animals with behavioral concerns primarily acquired by referral from veterinarians or other clients. He has been training animals full time and on a one-on-one basis since 1986.

In addition to his business, Ken is a certified evaluator and was an evaluator instructor with the Pet Partner program. Not only does he evaluate and certify animal/handler teams for activity and therapy programs, but he also helped to develop the Pet Partner Skills and Aptitude Test which he has taught both nationally and internationally. Currently he sits on the national Therapy Animal Program Advisory Team that looks into incidents and policies for the Pet Partner program.

Ken has presented on the subject of animal behavior at the University of Akron, Columbus State University, the Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine and the Midwest Veterinary Conference (all in Ohio), the Society of Anthrozoologists, the International Association of Animal Behavior Consultants, Chienposium (in Canada), D.I.N.G.O. (in Japan and Taiwan) and many, many other animal related groups.

In addition, Wolf Park in Battleground, Indiana, which is a research facility that studies wolf, coyote and fox behavior, utilizes Ken for some of its presentations and research projects, and has been allowing him to train with their wolves for over 18 years.

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Jacqueline Munera, CCBC, PCBC, CAP2

Jacqueline Munera, CCBC, PCBC, CAP2
Jacqueline Munera, CCBC, PCBC, CAP2

Jacqueline Munera, CCBC, PCBC, CAP2, owner of Positive Cattitudes, encourages people to push the boundaries of what they think cats are capable of.  She is an IAABC Certified Cat Behavior Consultant and co-instructor of the Companion Animal Sciences Institute's Diploma of Feline Behavior program. She has a B.A. in Honors Biological Psychology from New College of Florida, where she pursued studies on animal cognition and behavior, and thesis work on coat color as an indicator of cat personality. Jacqueline presents and publishes on a variety of cat training and behavior topics. She is especially interested in helping shelter and rescue organizations make their cats more adoptable through cat training and behavior programs.  View some of her videos, including Ankle Attack, the winner of the 2007 Karen Pryor Canis Film Festival's feline division, on her channel at www.youtube.com/PositiveCattitudes . You can order her "What Is My Cat Saying?"  Feline Communication 101 CD at www.dogwise.com or as a download at www.DogKingdom.com .

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Christopher Pachel, DVM, DACVB

Christopher Pachel, DVM, DACVB
Christopher Pachel, DVM, DACVB

Christopher Pachel, DVM, DACVB received his veterinary degree from the University of MN in 2002 and practiced veterinary medicine as a general practitioner for two years in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area prior to the start of residency training in the field of veterinary behavior in 2004.  He had the unique opportunity to experience the benefits of both a conforming program at the University of MN, and then a non-conforming program under the supervision of Dr. Jacqui Neilson in Portland, OR.  He operated a house-call behavior practice in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area from 2005 until 2010 prior to moving to Portland, OR.  He became board certified by the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists in 2010 and in 2011 became the owner of the Animal Behavior Clinic, a behavior exclusive practice for both cats and dogs in Portland, OR. He has lectured in the US and Canada and has taught courses in veterinary behavior at the University of MN and at the Virginia Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine. 

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Emma Parsons, CDBC, BA

Emma Parsons, CDBC, BA
Emma Parsons, CDBC, BA

Emma Parsons has been training dogs for more than 20 years, and is currently the Canine Behavior Training Consultant for the VCA Rotherwood Animal Hospital in Newton, MA. She specializes in managing and rehabilitating the reactive and aggressive dog. Emma is a faculty member of Karen Pryor Academy for Animal Training & Behavior as well as of the Karen Pryor ClickerExpo conferences. She gives "Click to Calm" seminars around the world, teaching others how to manage and rehabilitate reactive and aggressive dogs. She is a member of the Association of Pet Dog Trainers (APDT) and a Certified Dog Behavior Consultant (CDBC) of the International Association of Animal Behavior Consultants (IAABC). Emma holds a BA degree from the University of Massachusetts Lowell, and shares her life with her husband, Greg, and their four clicker-trained dogs—three Goldens, Lizzie-Taylor, Kayden-Blue, Austyn-Roque, and a Papillon, Wylie-Rae.

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Sue Sternberg

Sue Sternberg
Sue Sternberg

Sue has over 30 years of dog behavior experience, including as a dog control officer, kennel and animal care technician at various shelters, dog trainer, behavior counselor, dog training instructor, temperament evaluator, boarding kennel owner, veterinary assistant, is a successful competitor in a variety of dog sports, and a teacher of dog trainers.

She is the author of Successful Dog Adoption (Howell Book House, www.amazon.com) Out and About with your Dog (training and evaluating dog-dog behaviors) and Serious Fun (a guide to teaching your dog to play, training tricks and more) and has produced many DVDs on dog behavior and aggression, and an iPhone app, The Dog Park Assistant (find these at www.GreatDogProductions.com).

Sue has four heeler mixes adopted from various places, all ruled by one awesome cat, Sanjay Gupta. She is an accomplished fiddle player, an avid mineral and fossil collector, loves Earl Grey tea, and is a major Star Trek fan.

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Risë VanFleet, PhD, RPT-S, CDBC

Risë VanFleet, PhD, RPT-S, CDBC
Risë VanFleet, PhD, RPT-S, CDBC

Risë VanFleet, PhD, RPT-S, CDBC is a licensed psychologist, registered play therapist-supervisor, and certified dog behavior consultant who directs both the Playful Pooch Program and the Family Enhancement & Play Therapy Center in Boiling Springs, PA.

She has over 40 years of experience working with children, parents, families, and groups in a variety of mental health and educational settings. Her work developing Animal Assisted Play Therapy brought her more fully into the dog training/consultation world, and she teaches mental health professionals about canine ethology, development, communication, and behavior/training for their AAPT work. She has volunteered her training/behavior services at a local rescue for the past decade, and provides in-home dog behavior consultation with families and other rescue organizations.

She has a special interest in highly fearful, unsocialized, and traumatized dogs, and has pioneered the systematic use of play as part of their rehabilitation. She regularly presents at national and international conferences.

She is the author of dozens of professional books, chapters, and articles about child/family therapy, play therapy, and dog training, and of the acclaimed Human Half of Dog Training: Collaborating with Clients to Get Results (Dogwise, 2013). She has received 12 national awards for her contributions to the field of psychology and her writing, including several books and articles honored with DWAA awards. She is currently writing a guide for dog trainers and behaviorists on how to work with traumatized dogs. She regularly learns from her 5 dogs and 3 cats.

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Clive Wynne, Ph.D.

Clive Wynne, Ph.D.
Clive Wynne, Ph.D.

Clive Wynne, Ph.D., is Professor of Psychology at Arizona State University, where he directs the Canine Science Collaboratory. He is also Director of Research at Wolf Park in Indiana. In recent years, Clive's research interests have focused on dogs and their wild relatives, but over the last 30 years he has studied the behavior of animals ranging from pigeons to dunnarts (a mouse-sized marsupial) and from bats to Galápagos tortoises. He received his Ph.D. from Edinburgh University and his Bachelors from University College London. Always fascinated by the things animals do, in recent years he has developed an additional interest in how people relate to animals.

When not working, he talks to his dog – even though research from his own lab suggests dogs are largely indifferent to what people say to them.

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Dr. Ian Dunbar, PhD, MRCVS

Dr. Ian Dunbar, PhD, MRCVS
Dr. Ian Dunbar, PhD, MRCVS

Ian Dunbar is a veterinarian, animal behaviorist, and dog trainer. He has authored numerous books and DVDs about puppy/dog behavior and training. He received his veterinary degree and a Special Honors degree in Physiology & Biochemistry from the Royal Veterinary College (London University) and a doctorate in animal behavior from the Psychology Department at the University of California in Berkeley, where he spent ten years researching olfactory communication, the development of hierarchical social behavior, and aggression in domestic dogs.

Dr. Dunbar is a member of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons, the California Veterinary Medical Association, the Sierra Veterinary Medical Association, the American Veterinary Society of Animal Behavior, the Association of Pet Dog Trainers, the International Association of Animal Behavior Consultants, and the Canadian Association of Professional Pet Dog Trainers. Over the past 30 years, he has given over 850 one-day seminars and workshops for dog trainers and veterinarians in an effort to popularize off-leash, puppy socialization classes, temperament modification, and owner-friendly and dog-friendly dog training.

Dr. Dunbar is currently the Director of the Center of Applied Animal Behavior in Berkeley, California where he lives with his wife Kelly, dogs Claude and Dune, and kitties Mayhem and Ugli.

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